Tomato, Pepper and Eggplant Varieties for 2015

We’re doing plant starts again this year – peppers, tomatoes and eggplants. We will also be doing artichoke plants again and hopefully be including herbs. Last year we sold out within 3 weeks so I wanted to give you all a chance to pre-order them so you can get the varieties you want. We will also be increasing our production along with adding more varieties. If you want specific varieties please let me know (contact us here) and I will make sure I have plants set aside for you. They are $3.50 each or 3 for $10. They will be available for planting around mid March. We will also hopefully be selling them again at Moschetti’s as well as a possible second location (stay tuned).

Last year we attended a tomato tasting and then held our own tomato tasting event. Our primary focus was finding tomatoes that were not only productive but also had exceptional flavor. Some of the varieties we grew last year didn’t make the cut but we found many more to take their place.

The varieties are:

Eggplant Varieties

5701042400_6b4323bf2e_nCaspar – I adore this eggplant. It’s a long Japanese style eggplant with white skin and very creamy white flesh. If you aren’t a huge fan of eggplant (like myself), this is definitely one to try. It may just make you a convert.

 

 

Diamond-EggplantDiamond – A good, productive Japanese style eggplant. Very good sliced, marinated and grilled.

 

 

Pepper Varieties-Hot

anaheim peppers copyAnaheim (Nu Mex Joe E. Parker) – These are the perfect roasting peppers. The thick skin easily blisters and can be peeled away after roasting. They are mild to medium heat. Not quite as productive as the smaller hot peppers, but they do give a good harvest when picked continuously.

 

PoblanosAncho Gigantea (Poblano) – Relatively mild, productive pepper that is great dried or roasted. This is the standard pepper for stuffing. Green peppers are called Poblanos and red peppers are Anchos.

 

 

cayenne peppers copyCayenne Slim – Very productive plant of HOT peppers. Walls are thin so they dry quickly. We dried the peppers (they readily dry on the plant) and then ground them into red pepper flakes. We now call them Satan Flakes because of their excessive heat.

 

 

Jalapeno

Craig’s Grande Jalapeno – Sometimes you just want a middle-of-the-road hot pepper. We generally haven’t had much luck getting jalapenos hot enough for our taste, but this year we’re going to give this variety a try and see if we can see some success. No other pepper seems to work as well as the trusty jalapeno for escabeche.

 

habanero peppers copyMustard Habanero – I got several emails this past year from people that were very happy with these plants. If you want your peppers to be spicy make sure to grow them next to a habanero plant. This was a trick I learned from a friend and was surprised to find out that it works! These are productive plants with EXTRA HOT peppers.

 

Padron-Pepper-1Pimiento de Padron  – We grew these last year and they started out delicious but as summer rolled on they became increasingly hot. This year we’re trying a different seed vendor. They are usually a mild, small Spanish pepper that is traditionally fried. Sometimes you’ll get a hot one. They are fantastic stuffed with a bit of goat cheese before frying.

 

serrano peppers copySerrano Tampequino - Another very productive pepper with thick walls that are perfect for making hot sauce. The original variety used to make Sriracha Hot Sauce. Also very hot, but not as hot as the Cayenne Slim.

 

 

Pepper Varieties-Sweet

California WonderCalifornia Wonder – The standard green and red bell pepper for California. Good production with thick walled fruits.

 

 

Canary BellCanary Bell – We haven’t tried a yellow bell yet, so we decided to go with this one. It is highly productive, sets early and continues all through summer and is also resistant to Tobacco Mosaic Virus.

 

 

Pepper-Etiuda-PP192-webEtuida Bell – When I read that this was considered one of the best tasting peppers out there, I had to try it. It is a productive producer of very large, thick skinned fruit.

 

 

Pepper-Horizon-Bell-Pepper-PP187-webHorizon Bell – This is a pepper to replace the Orange Bell as it is more productive while not sacrificing flavor.

 

 

nardello-aJimmy Nardello – We got a LOT of requests to grow this pepper. It looks like it will be hot but ends up being incredibly sweet and flavorful. It’s an Italian frying pepper that is productive and has earned itself a place on Slow Food’s “Ark of Taste.”

 

 

purple beautyPurple Beauty – We grew this on a whim last year and were surprised at how well it sells. It produces a multitude of medium sized, thin walled purple fruit that are easy to find in among the foliage.

 

 

quadrato-d-asti-giallo-pepperQuadrato Asti Giallo – This has been our most productive bell pepper giving us good sized, thick walled fruit all through summer. This is an Italian pepper that is green slowly ripening to yellow.

 

 

Tomatoes

Amish Paste – Of the many paste tomatoes we tasted, this one was far and away, the best tasting. I look forward to trying the concentrated flavor of these when canning. Nice sized red Roma type tomatoes that are good for both canning and fresh eating (something you can’t say about most paste tomatoes).

 

Aunt Gertie’s Gold – One of the all-around best tasting tomatoes available. A golden yellow tomato that can grow to nearly a pound provides a sweet, fruity and complex flavor.

 

Aunt Lucy’s Italian Paste – Abundant producer of 2″ round red paste tomatoes with few seeds. From Italy, this is a very rare tomato variety, but should earn a place at anyone’s table. Classic sweet, tart flavor that is expected of old Italian heirloom tomatoes.

 

Aussie – This large red tomato is a replacement for Brandywine, which is popular, but just can’t win the taste tests like Aussie can. Aussie offers a very well balanced old-fashioned tomato flavor in a large, 1lb package on large vigorous plants.

 

black krimBlack Krim – One of our most popular varieties. A purple-black beefsteak with a hearty, rich flavor. Fruits get darker when exposed to sunlight. Productive.

 

 

Blush – Elongated cherry tomatoes, they start out a striped yellow and ripen with a pink blush to them. Productive plants give you sweet, fruity and refreshing fruit that you won’t be able to stop eating right off the vine.

 

Carmello – This red French variety (we have are offering an open pollinated strain) is thought to be one of the most productive varieties available, this tomatoes pumps out juicy fruits that have exceptional balanced flavor. Shows disease resistance.

 

 

Cherokee Green

Cherokee Green – A green beefsteak that has a bold, bright flavor with acid. My husband says it’s “zingy.” Best flavor of the green tomatoes. Very productive plant. Just keep an eye on it so you don’t wait too long to pick the fruits which will have a yellow hue with ripe.

 

Dixie Golden Giant – A whopper of a tomato coming in at almost 2lbs, this lemon yellow tomato has an incredible mild and sweet, fruity flavor. Shows some disease resistance and like most Amish varieties is very productive.

 

green zebraGreen Zebra – Small 2-1/2″-3″  salad tomato that is green with darker green stripes. Fruit is sweet and “zingy.” Very productive plant if you can find all the fruit! The light green will have a yellow hue when ripe. Makes a really good green pesto bruschetta.

 

 

Henderson’s Winsall – The original Winsall variety obtained from the USDA Seed Bank. A pink beefsteak heirloom that is nearly seedless. It is a late variety but the superb flavor is worth the wait.

 

HillbillyHillbilly – Big yellow orange beefsteak with red streaks. Husband describes it as “rich, meaty, tomato-y goodness.” The favorite tomato around here. Few seeds and very fleshy.

 

 

isis candyIsis Candy – Orange cherry tomato with red starburst. Very productive of small sweet, fruity tomatoes that you can just pop in your mouth.

 

 

Mr. Stripey – For whatever reason, many striped tomatoes tend not to have as much flavor as their solid colored compadres. I surmise that it is due to the coloring of the striped tomato being the primary focus, rather than the flavor. Mr. Stripey, fortunately, is not one of them. These are smaller salad size tomatoes with a rich, tangy flavor.

 

Rosso SicilianRosso Sicilian –  This is an Italian heirloom with small to medium sized ribbed fruits that are firm and meaty and perfect for making sauce and paste. Bruises easily. Rated as one of the better tasting tomatoes we grew last year.

 

 

siouxSioux – We grew this small rather unassuming red tomato last year only because we got a packet of free seeds. At our tomato tasting we were surprised that it outperformed all of the other tomatoes and was hands down the favorite out of 16 varieties. Sweet, tangy, rich and complex, you won’t regret making space for this variety.

 

stupice-homeStupice – This very early tomato blew me away this year with it’s productiveness. Small tomatoes, but not quite cherry size are born as early as late June and continues through until the frost. Sweet and flavorful.

 

 

Super Sioux – A variety of Sioux that takes heat and drought better. While Sioux is better for fresh eating, Super Sioux is better suited for canning.

 

 

Tangerine – This is our replacement for Kellogg’s Breakfast. A productive yellow-orange beefsteak with improved flavor that is meaty, sweet and rich.

 

 

Thessaloniki – A red Greek tomato that resists cracking and sun scald. Fantastic old fashioned acid tomato flavor. I have farmer friends that say they only will start selling the fruit from this variety after they physically can no longer eat them.

 

 

WPeachWapsipinicon Peach – A small yellow tomato with an unusually fuzzy skin. Productive plant of very, very sweet, mild fruit with a hint of peach. Husband says “sweetest tomato I’ve ever eaten.”

Comments

  1. Inquiring minds must know…..How many tomato plants do you grow every season? And how many Varieties? I have trouble finding the space to grow as many as I would like to, being urban myself. I am wondering if there is any tricks or advice you can offer. Thanks!

    • We grow at least one of each variety, sometimes more. We utilize the front and back yard but we also are on a quarter acre with a small house so we have lot of room for tomatoes. The best trick I can tell you is to make sure your soil is very fertile (get it tested by a lab). The more fertile it is the more plants you can cram in.

      • I have never thought about getting my soil tested. We have just under a third acre. I raise rabbits for fiber/manure/meat, goats for milk and companionship, and chickens for eggs and pest control. We have been turning our lawn into garden for the last wo years now with 1600sq ft of fruits, and 600sqft of veggies. My biggest problem is the conifers that shade alot of the property and at 1k per tree to bring them down…..well, it not happening fast.

        Anyway, I love your blog, you are very inspiring.

  2. I want to order some tomatoes and peppers from you for the spring. How can I do that?

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